Under Construction

While other parts of the country put construction projects on hold so they can dig themselves out of the snow, our projects are moving full-steam ahead!

Benjie went down to St. Simon's Island for his first site visit there this week. We are excited that this project is getting started. And we approve of dog-help on job sites!

Spring Island

The Spring Island house is coming along very nicely. Currently, Esposito Construction is installing interior trim and wood floors. They are going to begin installing cabinets and tile next week.

Port Royal Plantation

There has been good progress at the Port Royal Plantation house. I love the front elevation, its really going to look great with a bright red front door!

 

Long Cove Renovation

Our major renovation in Long Cove has drywall hung and they will begin installing trim soon.

Factory Creek House

All the drywall is hung in the Factory Creek House and the painters are beginning to prime the walls. The views from this house are stellar, the clients are going to love having all those windows!

Factory Creek House 2

This Factory Creek house should be finishing up soon.

Brays Island Renovation

We are counting the days until this renovation is complete. 

 


Best practices to mitigate stormwater runoff

 Here is an example of a rain garden that Thomas Angell, of Verdant Enterprises, designed for the Cole Residence.Here is an example of a rain garden that Thomas Angell, of Verdant Enterprises, designed for the Cole Residence.

In David Lauderdale’s interview with Al Segars in last Sunday’s paper, Al said that we need to “go above and beyond. See that your homeowners’ association maintains it storm-water retention ponds so they function as promised.” You can read Lauderdale's article here.

Beaufort County has a storm-water runoff management ordinance for new single family houses in unincorporated areas of the county that are not in an approved community storm-water runoff system and single family houses that are renovated in excess of 50% of the appraised value of the building. The ordinance requires the mitigation of the storm-water within the property limits.

For the rest of us, we should all go above and beyond by reducing the amount of storm-water on our properties that needs to be mitigated. The easiest way to reduce runoff is by reducing the amount of impervious surfaces on the property. This includes: using gravel or pervious pavers for your drive; and limiting the amount of patios and terraces or paving them with pervious pavers.

Collecting Rainwater

The best management practice is to collect and store the rainwater for reuse or slow infiltration. There are two options for collecting rainwater; either a rain barrel or a cistern. Both are connected to your gutters and downspouts. A rainbarrel is used to collect water for use in your garden. Be sure that the rainbarrel has a cover so that it is not a mosquito nursery. A cistern is larger and is the storage tank portion in a complete rainwater harvesting system that filters and stores water for any normal household use. If the water is to be used for potable needs it must go through additional filtration and water purification.

Rain Garden

Another option is a rain garden which is a shallow bowl shaped depression of loose absorbent soils that is planted with deep-rooted native perennials and grasses. The runoff slowly soaks into the ground and reduces the amount of runoff entering our marshes and rivers. The design of the rain garden should be incorporated with the entire garden design. According to Garden Design Magazine rain gardens can help reduce storm-water waste by up to 99 percent.

Mitigation Calculations

The county has a very easy to use on-line worksheet that calculates how much runoff needs to be mitigated. http://stormwaterworksheet.createandsolve.com/  To determine the total excess runoff to be mitigated you will need to know the following information before you begin: the square footage of your roof; the square footage of other impervious areas; the square footage of your lot; your soil type, sandy or clayey; and the area of your lot that is irrigated. You next enter the number and size of storage and reuse systems want to use. The worksheet then computes the natural infiltration capacity of the lot to control runoff. If the first two practices do not control all of the rainwater, the worksheet determines the size of a raingarden to capture all of the runoff.