Under Construction- December

While other parts of the country put construction projects on hold so they can dig themselves out of the snow, our projects are moving full-steam ahead! See the latest site visit photos in our December construction update.

Benjie went down to St. Simon's Island for his first site visit there this week. We are excited that this project is getting started. And we approve of dog-help on job sites!

Spring Island

The Spring Island house is coming along very nicely. Currently, Esposito Construction is installing interior trim and wood floors. They are going to begin installing cabinets and tile next week.

Port Royal Plantation

There has been good progress at the Port Royal Plantation house. I love the front elevation, its really going to look great with a bright red front door!

 

Long Cove Renovation

Our major renovation in Long Cove has drywall hung and they will begin installing trim soon.

Factory Creek House

All the drywall is hung in the Factory Creek House and the painters are beginning to prime the walls. The views from this house are stellar, the clients are going to love having all those windows!

Factory Creek House 2

This Factory Creek house should be finishing up soon.

Brays Island Renovation

We are counting the days until this renovation is complete. 

 


Best practices to mitigate stormwater runoff

 Here is an example of a rain garden that Thomas Angell, of Verdant Enterprises, designed for the Cole Residence.Here is an example of a rain garden that Thomas Angell, of Verdant Enterprises, designed for the Cole Residence.

In David Lauderdale’s interview with Al Segars in last Sunday’s paper, Al said that we need to “go above and beyond. See that your homeowners’ association maintains it storm-water retention ponds so they function as promised.” You can read Lauderdale's article here.

Beaufort County has a storm-water runoff management ordinance for new single family houses in unincorporated areas of the county that are not in an approved community storm-water runoff system and single family houses that are renovated in excess of 50% of the appraised value of the building. The ordinance requires the mitigation of the storm-water within the property limits.

For the rest of us, we should all go above and beyond by reducing the amount of storm-water on our properties that needs to be mitigated. The easiest way to reduce runoff is by reducing the amount of impervious surfaces on the property. This includes: using gravel or pervious pavers for your drive; and limiting the amount of patios and terraces or paving them with pervious pavers.

Collecting Rainwater

The best management practice is to collect and store the rainwater for reuse or slow infiltration. There are two options for collecting rainwater; either a rain barrel or a cistern. Both are connected to your gutters and downspouts. A rainbarrel is used to collect water for use in your garden. Be sure that the rainbarrel has a cover so that it is not a mosquito nursery. A cistern is larger and is the storage tank portion in a complete rainwater harvesting system that filters and stores water for any normal household use. If the water is to be used for potable needs it must go through additional filtration and water purification.

Rain Garden

Another option is a rain garden which is a shallow bowl shaped depression of loose absorbent soils that is planted with deep-rooted native perennials and grasses. The runoff slowly soaks into the ground and reduces the amount of runoff entering our marshes and rivers. The design of the rain garden should be incorporated with the entire garden design. According to Garden Design Magazine rain gardens can help reduce storm-water waste by up to 99 percent.

Mitigation Calculations

The county has a very easy to use on-line worksheet that calculates how much runoff needs to be mitigated. http://stormwaterworksheet.createandsolve.com/  To determine the total excess runoff to be mitigated you will need to know the following information before you begin: the square footage of your roof; the square footage of other impervious areas; the square footage of your lot; your soil type, sandy or clayey; and the area of your lot that is irrigated. You next enter the number and size of storage and reuse systems want to use. The worksheet then computes the natural infiltration capacity of the lot to control runoff. If the first two practices do not control all of the rainwater, the worksheet determines the size of a raingarden to capture all of the runoff.


Under Construction

We are all excited about the construction progress at the Factory Creek house. Howell Builders is doing a great job!

The garage and carriage house

It is exciting to see the form of the house taking shape, as the second floor framing goes up.

There is quite a nice view of Factory Creek from the second floor. 

 Tom is checking out the window framing
Tom is checking out the window framing

This Palmetto Bluff House is almost finished.

The Berkeley Hall project is almost completed, too.


Summer in the Lowcountry

Summer is probably my favorite season in the Lowcountry (good thing, since its our longest season). Sure, it's hot, muggy and buggy, but with water all around us, it is easy to find relief from the heat.

Hunting Island State Park reopened earlier this month after significant damages from Hurricane Matthew. Hooray!!! Thanks to everyone involved in cleanup and restoration!!

  Hunting Island sunrise over the ocean. Simply gorgeous!  Hunting Island sunrise over the ocean. Simply gorgeous!  Hunting Island may look different than before the hurricane, but that is the nature of a barrier island. It is still a magical and awesome place to visit. Hunting Island may look different than before the hurricane, but that is the nature of a barrier island. It is still a magical and awesome place to visit.

You can find most of our staff on the beach or on the river most every weekend during summer. Our waterways and barrier islands are surely one of the best things about living in Beaufort.

 Michael takes advantage of a high tide to launch his kayak from the backyard for a quick paddle with his granddaughter. Michael takes advantage of a high tide to launch his kayak from the backyard for a quick paddle with his granddaughter.

Beaufort has a temperate climate (we are in Zone 9 of the USDA map) which means lots tropical plants thrive here. I walked around the garden surrounding our office today, and wow!

 Hibiscus coccineus, native swamp hibiscus Hibiscus coccineus, native swamp hibiscus  Alpinia zerumbet 'Variegata' aka variegated ginger Alpinia zerumbet 'Variegata' aka variegated ginger  Strelitzia, aka Bird of Paradise Strelitzia, aka Bird of Paradise

It's so easy for Beaufortonians to love where we live!


Frederick + Frederick Architects Awarded American Institute of Architect South Carolina 2017 Firm Award

The AIA South Carolina Board of Directors awarded Frederick + Frederick Architects with the 2017 Firm Award at their annual awards banquet on April 21, 2017. The Firm Award is the highest honor that the American Institute of Architects South Carolina Chapter can bestow upon a South Carolina architectural firm. The award is given in recognition of design excellence and contribution to the profession of architecture that has made a lasting influence on the practice of architecture in South Carolina.

Kate Schwennsen, Director + Professor, Clemson School of Architecture, wrote in her nomination letter, “Frederick + Frederick is unquestionably a Small Firm with Big Impact, and a firm that many other firms look to for exemplary practice. The design excellence of their body of work has been widely recognized … But perhaps what is most uniquely important about Frederick + Frederick, the raison d’etre of their success, and the thing from which other firms could learn the most, is their innovative and supportive firm culture. They are a family-owned business that sincerely treats their employees like family. Jane and Michael moved to Beaufort to enjoy the lifestyle there … [and] so they do.”

Principal Jane Frederick said that they are humbled and thrilled to be recognized by their peers. “We would not be where we are today without all the fantastic clients who have made our work possible.” The Firm Award was first conferred in 1993 and Frederick + Frederick Architects is the tenth firm to receive the recognition in the awards 24-year history. Frederick + Frederick is honored and delighted to be the 2017 AIA South Carolina Firm Award Recipient.

Frederick + Frederick Architects specialize in custom homes for hot, humid climates. The Beaufort, South Carolina, firm was established in 1989 by the husband and wife team of Jane and Michael Frederick.


"Suited to a T"

T House featured in Residential Design Magazine!

The new national magazine, Residential Design, chose to publish our T-House in their second-ever issue! We couldn't be more pleased with the article, which so accurately captures the essence of our town and our firm. This project was great fun and our enjoyment of the design and process is reflected in the final product.

Editor Claire Conroy wrote, “Although much new building in the area evokes the “Lowcountry” look without a thoughtful understanding of its practical aspects and pleasing proportions, several local firms are mining these antecedents in fresh, appealing ways. Frederick + Frederick is one of the best examples. Jane and Michael have a deep knowledge of the climate, sensibilities, and sensitivities of the place they call home and headquarters for the firm. They understand the traditions of the Lowcountry, and the subtle ways to honor and elevate them at the same time.”

The issue focuses on small houses. Conroy commented “A small house is like a poem. Each design choice must fit the rhythm perfectly. It’s often as much about editing out what’s not essential as it is about choosing what to include.”

Check out the article from Residential Design here

View more photographs of the T-House on our portfolio page, here.

See this project from beginning to end in our video "The Architectural Process."