Crosby Addition

Revisiting the Crosby's House

It is always fun to revisit a project after many years. Usually we are called in when a new owner buys one of our houses and wants to make it their own. This fall we are revisiting the Crosby's house for the original owners. The house was built as a weekend retreat and over the years the Crosbys decided it should be their full time residence. This prompted them to call us to add a true master's suite, enlarge the mud room and add a larger laundry room.

The Crosby's bought the vacant lot next door so the new master suite expands to the east. The existing master bedroom becomes a new den; while the existing master bath and closet becomes a bath for the pool and the laundry. The former laundry becomes a pantry and a mud room is added onto the western side between the house and garage.

Crosby Addition

Here is a link to the original house.


Broad Margins by Frank Lloyd Wright

Broad Margin by Frank Lloyd Wright

Several years ago, we had the delightful pleasure of visiting, Broad Margin, the only other project designed by Frank Lloyd Wright in South Carolina. We were entertained by the original contractor and viewed the complete set of working drawings for the house and furniture, all six pages of them!

The 1727 square foot, three bedroom, two and one half bath, Broad Margin was designed by Wright in 1951 for sisters, the Misses Gabrielle and Charlcey Austin. Wright named the house Broad Margin after the passage, “I love a broad margin to my life.” from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden.   In 1978, the house was listed on the National Registered of Historic Places.

Usonian House

Broad Margin is an Usonian House, a term coined by Wright to describe his small affordable houses that were typically single story, built on a concrete slab of native materials with large overhangs. He was particularly sensitive to building the house to fit into the landscape.

Siting

The siting of the Broad Margin is quintessential Wright. The downtown Greenville site is heavily wooded and bordered by two creeks; you feel like you are miles from civilization. The approach to the house is from above and your first view is of the large low sloped roof. The modest entrance is through the carport into a narrow hall that functions as a spine to the building. All the rooms open out to the view and a series of decks that step down the hillside.

The house is constructed of stone, poured in place concrete, Lowcountry cypress and glass. The great room has a magnificent sunken stone fireplace as the focal point. The kitchen is the only room without a view but it has an eighteen foot ceiling culminating in a skylight. The floor is Wright’s signature red poured in place concrete with radiant heating.

The current owner has lovingly restored the house and had the dining room table rebuilt to Wright’s specifications, a previous owner sold the dining room furniture. Most of the other original furniture designed by Wright is still in place.

 


Phillip Johnson Berm House

A Trip to Cincinnati

Phillip Johnson's Geier House

Our office attended the AIA Custom Residential Architect's Network Symposium in Cincinnati. One of the highlights of the home tour was Phillip Johnson's Geier House, which is also called the Berm House. The house was built in 1965 in the town Indian Hills just a few miles northeast of Cincinnati. The flat site was modified to create a small lake and the house was built into berms. All the rooms have large glass walls opening onto the lake.

 

Peterloon Foundation

This big snail (one of four) is on the wall between the dependency building and the main house at the Peterloon Foundation. The country estate was designed in 1928 by the architecture firm of Delano & Aldrich.

Rauh House

This 1938 International Style house was designed by John Becker. It is located Woodlawn, Ohio. The house had changed hands several time and had fallen into disrepair. It was slated to be demolished until Emily Pulitzer, who grew up in the home, stepped in and paid for the restoration. She donated the house to the Cincinnati Preservation Society, who put restrictions on the property and sold it to the current owner.

Hawkins House

The Hawkins house was designed for a client who uses a wheel chair which inspired the interior and exterior ramps. This Indian Hills, Ohio house was designed by architect David Niland


Aging in Place

Our office recently attended the American Institute of Architects Custom Residential Architects Network Symposium in Cincinnati. We toured a 1980’s modern house that was designed for a client who uses a wheelchair. The three story house included a sculptural interior ramp connecting each floor. Designing for aging in place does not have to include an interior ramp; in fact accommodating the possibility of being less mobile is relatively easy. There are three major areas of consideration for aging in place; life-safety, fall prevention, and convenience.

Life Safety

The number one life safety issue is providing an accessible exit from each bedroom. This could be an interior ramp or it could be exterior doors from the bedrooms opening onto an area of refuge, which might be directly on grade or a balcony large enough for a wheelchair.

In two story houses and houses raised up out of the flood plain, we often install  a residential elevator or stack elevator sized closets for a future elevator. When planning for a future elevator the closet floor should be framed for easy removal. In houses less than five feet off the ground, we often include a ramp to the back or side door. A custom designed ramp will fit in with the overall architecture of the house.

Accessible doors are 36 inches wide and will preferably have flush thresholds but a maximum threshold of ½ inch exterior and ¼ inch interior. Hallways should be at least 42 inches wide. Every room including bathrooms should have an open space of 5 feet by 5 feet for wheelchair maneuverability.

Fall Prevention

Floor material, adequate lighting, and grab bars are the keys to help prevent falls. Floors should be smooth, firm, and slip resistant. Carpet should be low pile (less than ½ inch) with a firm pad. There should be plenty of natural light as well as both overall room lighting and task lighting. Particular care should be given to lighting stairwells, showers, entry doors, and exterior walkways.  Stairwells should have switches at both the top and bottom and hallways at both ends.

Stairwells should have handrails on both sides of the stairs. In bathrooms, install or provide blocking for future installation of grab bars in the shower, bathtub, and around the toilet. Likewise, you might want to install blocking in the hallways for future grab bars.

Convenience

For greater convenience you might consider one floor living, low maintenance materials, and a 5-foot accessible aisle in the carport or garage for wheelchair access. Lever door handles and faucets are easier for arthritic hands to open.

Smart home technology can assist in aging in place with voice controlled lights, small appliances, and locks. Video doorbells allow the homeowner to see who is at the door before answering it. Doors can be opened by motion sensors or remote control.

Finally, the construction of a separate guest house or two master suites can accommodate an aging relative or a live in nurse.

For more information visit the National Aging in Place Council website www.naipc.org

 

 


On the Boards in September

This month our projects on the boards include two renovation projects and the house in Seattle that we have been working on for a while.

Addition and Renovation on Lady's Island

This project on the boards is a small house just down the street from our office. It is on the marshes of the inter-coastal waterway with great trees and a fantastic view. The existing house has a garage and storage on the ground floor which is in the flood plain. We are renovating the first floor and adding a second floor which will house the master bedroom suite and office.

Renovation on St. Helena's Island

The previous owner of this house watched too much HGTV - it is a DIY nightmare. My five year old granddaughter probably could do a better job than this one. Some projects were started and never finished and others looked like whatever material happened to by lying around was used. As you can see it is on a beautiful view. The interior is extremely dark and does not open up to the view.

A new house in Seattle

We have been working on this project for a few months - this is the latest iteration of it. We think it just keeps getting better and better!


Suited to a T

The new national magazine, Residential Design, chose to publish our T-House in their second-ever issue! We couldn't be more pleased with the article, which so accurately captures the essence of our town and our firm. This project was great fun and our enjoyment of the design and process is reflected in the final product.

Editor Claire Conroy wrote, “Although much new building in the area evokes the “Lowcountry” look without a thoughtful understanding of its practical aspects and pleasing proportions, several local firms are mining these antecedents in fresh, appealing ways. Frederick + Frederick is one of the best examples. Jane and Michael have a deep knowledge of the climate, sensibilities, and sensitivities of the place they call home and headquarters for the firm. They understand the traditions of the Lowcountry, and the subtle ways to honor and elevate them at the same time.”

The issue focuses on small houses. Conroy commented “A small house is like a poem. Each design choice must fit the rhythm perfectly. It’s often as much about editing out what’s not essential as it is about choosing what to include.”

Check out the article from Residential Design here


AIA South Carolina 2017 Firm Award

The AIA South Carolina Board of Directors awarded Frederick + Frederick Architects with the 2017 Firm Award at their annual awards banquet on April 21, 2017. The Firm Award is the highest honor that the American Institute of Architects South Carolina Chapter can bestow upon a South Carolina architectural firm. The award is given in recognition of design excellence and contribution to the profession of architecture that has made a lasting influence on the practice of architecture in South Carolina.

Kate Schwennsen, Director + Professor, Clemson School of Architecture, wrote in her nomination letter, “Frederick + Frederick is unquestionably a Small Firm with Big Impact, and a firm that many other firms look to for exemplary practice. The design excellence of their body of work has been widely recognized … But perhaps what is most uniquely important about Frederick + Frederick, the raison d’etre of their success, and the thing from which other firms could learn the most, is their innovative and supportive firm culture. They are a family-owned business that sincerely treats their employees like family. Jane and Michael moved to Beaufort to enjoy the lifestyle there … [and] so they do.”

Principal Jane Frederick said that they are humbled and thrilled to be recognized by their peers. “We would not be where we are today without all the fantastic clients who have made our work possible.” The Firm Award was first conferred in 1993 and Frederick + Frederick Architects is the tenth firm to receive the recognition in the awards 24-year history. Frederick + Frederick is honored and delighted to be the 2017 AIA South Carolina Firm Award Recipient.

Frederick + Frederick Architects specialize in custom homes for hot, humid climates. The Beaufort, South Carolina, firm was established in 1989 by the husband and wife team of Jane and Michael Frederick.


Landscape Lighting

When designing your house one of the last considerations is the landscape lighting. Often the exterior lighting is limited to a decorative fixture by the front door and security lights on the corners of the house.  Light pollution regulations that require fixtures to be shielded also need to be considered. Exterior lighting can either be for you or the neighbors. When the front of the house is lit, it makes a statement, but you cannot see it from the interior.

Expand Your View

Most of our local houses have large windows to take advantage of the great views of the lowcountry landscape. Without the proper landscape lighting the windows become black mirrors at night creating a boxed in feel. Layering light in the garden connects you to the outside even at night by visually expanding the interior space.  It is important to remember that you are not recreating daylight, but a dynamic composition to enliven the outdoor room.

Layer Light

Like interior lighting, you want to use different levels of lighting in your garden.  Task lighting is used for grilling or reading. These lights are typically down lights and should be switched separately from the other exterior lights. Ambient lighting is indirect lighting that softens shadows.  Accent lights provide depth and dimensions and should be used sparingly.  Finally decorative lighting is the finishing touch.

Path lights are ambient lights that bounce off the ground. Care should be used in selecting one with a fully shielded light source so they do not appear to be a runway. Stair or step lights can be mounted in sides of the steps to illuminate the treads. This is also a safety concern to prevent falls. Step lights should also be shielded to only light the steps.

Accent lights are spot lights that are directed on statues or specimen plants. If they are located on the ground, they should be screened by the surrounding plantings. Be sure to layer accent lights with ambient lights so the garden does not appear spotty.

Decorative lights can be tricky because they are often way too small for the location. Remember that the decorative fixture will be viewed from a distance and should be in proportion to the door, porch and size of the house. Fixtures appear smaller in enclosed showrooms than in exterior spaces. If you are uncertain about the size of a fixture, make a cardboard silhouette and place on the wall.

Besides creating a safe environment, landscape lighting can expand your enjoyment of your garden when designed in anticipation of how you will use the space, whether it is alfresco dining, a swimming pool or enjoying a specimen tree from the inside.


Construction Costs

Many people who are contemplating building a new home are surprised at the cost of construction. The sticker shock is often due to the expectation of the same costs that were available during the recession. Our firm’s historical data of residential construction show that the average new home construction costs are still 38% less expensive than the few years before the great recession. So now is a good time to consider renovating or building a new house, while costs are greater than 2010 they are still less than 2007.

Designing for Hurricanes & Earthquakes add to the Construction Costs

Construction costs are higher in Beaufort County because we are in both a hurricane zone and an earthquake zone. The requirements to mitigate both of these hazards include the following:

  • Building the first floor above FEMA’s base flood elevation which adds to the foundation cost.
  • Structural Engineering fees to design code compliant structural systems.
  • Connecting the roof, through the walls to the foundation and footing with threaded rods, go-bolts, hurricane clips or other code approved methods. This adds to both the material and labor costs.
  • The shear walls required for lateral stability are more expensive than sheathing options available in other parts of the country.
  • Window and door openings must be protected from windblown debris. Impact rated windows can cost up to twice as much as non-impact openings.

Best Practices

There are several best practice options that will cost more initially but will either save money on your home insurance or utility bill that we recommend.

  • A secondary roof under a metal roof that ensure water tightness if the roof is compromised during high winds.
  • An U.L. certified lightning protection system will add $7,000 to $10,000 to a 2500 s.f. house but will protect your house and electronics from lightning strikes during our many lightning storms.
  • Spray foam insulation is typically 2 to 3 times more expensive than fiberglass insulation but is a far superior product. It stops air and moisture infiltration, will not sag, keeps dust and pollen out and reduces capacity requirements, maintenance and wear of heating and air conditioning equipment.

TV remodeling shows also add to unrealistic time and cost expectations. Those shows often have donated materials, low cost fees from the contractors and have pre-built a large portion in a warehouse prior to the show.

Cost, square footage (both inside and outside) and quality of materials and workmanship are the triad of construction. If cost is the driving issue in your project you must be flexible in the size of the project and the quality of materials and workmanship.


Lighting your House

Have you ever had the experience of arriving for a visit at someone’s house and the porch light wasn’t on? We end up wondering, ‘Are they expecting me?’ Let’s say it turns out that they are expecting you and you are ushered into a kitchen to chat under bright lights and then into a dining room that is somewhat dim. Lighting your house is essential for the right atmosphere.

Contrast this to pulling into a well-lit space on the driveway and following a path of attractive footlights up to a front porch that has a welcoming glow. Inside, sofas and chairs bathed in the glow of nearby lamps as well as some ambient lighting from above. When you step into the kitchen to help the chef, task lighting eases your vegetable chopping. Upon being invited into the dining room, the chandelier is the centerpiece over a dining room table on which the crystal and china seem simply lit up. Wondering how this has been accomplished, you notice two spotlights shining down onto the table from the ceiling, adding luster to the scene.

Layering Light

But let’s say you are working on a task one evening and entertaining the next. We like to use layering of the lights to achieve the desired effect. This way you are able to use ambient lighting so you can see to get through a room, task lighting for just those areas where you need it, ‘jewelry’ lighting like chandeliers for special occasions, and spotlighting to heighten the attention or effect. They can be used separately or in combination, particularly on special occasions.

Now, let’s say you’ve figured out or worked with a lighting designer to determine how to get just the right combination of lighting for a dinner party. That can be programmed into a control panel, as can several other lighting combinations. Then, it’s just the press of a button on a control panel or iPad to get the same arrangement again. Of course, we still like to have traditional switches on the wall so that visitors or grandparents will know how to work the lights.

Most of our local houses have large windows to take advantage of the great views of the Lowcountry landscape. Without the proper landscape lighting the windows become black mirrors at night creating a boxed in feel. Layering light in the garden connects you to the outside even at night by visually expanding the interior space.  It is important to remember that you are not recreating daylight, but a dynamic composition to enliven the outdoor room.

Garden Lighting

Like interior lighting, you want to use different levels of lighting in your garden.  Task lighting is used for grilling or reading. These lights are typically down lights and should be switched separately from the other exterior lights. Ambient lighting is indirect lighting that softens shadows.  Accent lights provide depth and dimensions and should be used sparingly.  Finally decorative lighting is the finishing touch welcoming you to the house.

Lighting is essential to being able to use your house in multiple ways and create the appropriate atmosphere for the occasion.