Phillip Johnson home tour

Cincinnati Home Tours

Geier House

Our office attended the AIA Custom Residential Architect's Network Symposium in Cincinnati. One of the highlights of the Cincinnati home tours was Phillip Johnson's Geier House, which is also called the Berm House. The house was built in 1968 in the town Indian Hills just a few miles northeast of Cincinnati. The flat site was modified to create a small lake and the house was built into berms. All the rooms have large glass walls opening onto the lake.

Peterloon Foundation

This big snail (one of four) is on the wall between the dependency building and the main house at the Peterloon Foundation. The country estate was designed in 1928 by the architecture firm of Delano & Aldrich.

Rauh House

Next on the home tour was this 1938 International Style house was designed by John Becker. It is located Woodlawn, Ohio. The house had changed hands several time and had fallen into disrepair. It was slated to be demolished until Emily Pulitzer, who grew up in the home, stepped in and paid for the restoration. She donated the house to the Cincinnati Preservation Society, who put restrictions on the property and sold it to the current owner.

 

Hawkins House

The Hawkins house was designed for a client who uses a wheel chair which inspired the interior and exterior ramps. This Indian Hills, Ohio house was designed by architect David Niland. The Hawkins house was originally constructed in 1984. The house was reconstructed in 1996, after major issues with water infiltration were discovered which were a result if impropert building envelope detailing.

 

We really enjoyed seeing a range of architectural styles on CRAN's Cincinnati home tour.


Under Construction- October Update

The weather has cooled down a bit and activity on these Beaufort County homes is in full swing. We are excited about the progress on these projects under construction in October, it is always a thrill to see our  designs come to life! It will not be long until we have happy, happy owners living in their dream homes!

Factory Creek House #2

This house is looking great with the siding and roofing completed. The electrical rough in is in progress.

Bray's Island Renovation & Addition

This project consists of a major renovation of an existing house, as well as a guest house addition.

They are prepping the main house for interior and exterior paint, as well as finishing up interior trim.

Brays Island guest house addition is in the framing phase.

Factory Creek House #1

The details are coming together beautifully in this house. We love the way the interior stair was executed.

This New Ravenna mosaic tile in the master bath is gorgeous!

Spring Island House

Siding and Roofing installation are in progress at our Spring Island project. Spray foam insulation is complete and the drywall should be hung soon. 

Port Royal Plantation House

This house is looking great with the drywall up! The contractor is beginning to run interior trim and install interior doors.


Aging in Place

Our office recently attended the American Institute of Architects Custom Residential Architects Network Symposium in Cincinnati. We toured a 1980’s modern house that was designed for a client who uses a wheelchair. The three story house included a sculptural interior ramp connecting each floor. Designing for aging in place does not have to include an interior ramp; in fact accommodating the possibility of being less mobile is relatively easy. There are three major areas of consideration for aging in place; life-safety, fall prevention, and convenience.

Life Safety

The number one life safety issue is providing an accessible exit from each bedroom. This could be an interior ramp or it could be exterior doors from the bedrooms opening onto an area of refuge, which might be directly on grade or a balcony large enough for a wheelchair.

In two story houses and houses raised up out of the flood plain, we often install  a residential elevator or stack elevator sized closets for a future elevator. When planning for a future elevator the closet floor should be framed for easy removal. In houses less than five feet off the ground, we often include a ramp to the back or side door. A custom designed ramp will fit in with the overall architecture of the house.

Accessible doors are 36 inches wide and will preferably have flush thresholds but a maximum threshold of ½ inch exterior and ¼ inch interior. Hallways should be at least 42 inches wide. Every room including bathrooms should have an open space of 5 feet by 5 feet for wheelchair maneuverability.

Fall Prevention

Floor material, adequate lighting, and grab bars are the keys to help prevent falls. Floors should be smooth, firm, and slip resistant. Carpet should be low pile (less than ½ inch) with a firm pad. There should be plenty of natural light as well as both overall room lighting and task lighting. Particular care should be given to lighting stairwells, showers, entry doors, and exterior walkways.  Stairwells should have switches at both the top and bottom and hallways at both ends.

Stairwells should have handrails on both sides of the stairs. In bathrooms, install or provide blocking for future installation of grab bars in the shower, bathtub, and around the toilet. Likewise, you might want to install blocking in the hallways for future grab bars.

Convenience

For greater convenience you might consider one floor living, low maintenance materials, and a 5-foot accessible aisle in the carport or garage for wheelchair access. Lever door handles and faucets are easier for arthritic hands to open.

Smart home technology can assist in aging in place with voice controlled lights, small appliances, and locks. Video doorbells allow the homeowner to see who is at the door before answering it. Doors can be opened by motion sensors or remote control.

Finally, the construction of a separate guest house or two master suites can accommodate an aging relative or a live in nurse.

For more information visit the National Aging in Place Council website www.naipc.org