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Residential architects who specialize in the hot, humid, southern climate

Lowcountry Architecture

This Lowcountry contemporary house is based on Lowcountry design principles. The large overhang keeps water off the walls and blocks the sun in the summertime. The one room wide house allows light and cross ventilation. The metal roof reflects the sun. The tabby foundation is a local material found in ruins just blocks from the house.

This Lowcountry contemporary house is based on Lowcountry design principles. The large overhang keeps water off the walls and blocks the sun in the summertime. The one room wide house allows light and cross ventilation. The metal roof reflects the sun. The tabby foundation is a local material found in ruins just blocks from the house.

Many new houses are designed in the Lowcountry style without considering the “why” behind the style. It is common to see large porches on the north façade, just because it is the front of the house. These porches are dank and block light from entering the house. Shutters are screwed to the house with no intention of ever protecting windows from a storm. The mass of the house can be so large there is no cross ventilation to cool the interiors or provide natural light on both sides of the room.

Early Lowcountry architecture evolved to respond to the unique characteristics of our hurricane-prone, hot, and humid climate.  Large porches on the south façade kept out the hot summer sun; large overhangs protected the walls and windows from rain and blocked the harsh sun; single width rooms provided cross ventilation and natural lighting; high ceilings kept the rooms cooler in the summertime; exterior window shutters provided protection from high winds; and a raised first floor protected the house from flood waters. You can follow these time-tested principles, which still make sense, and have an open modern floor plan that accommodates contemporary living.

Materials particular to the Lowcountry should be used instead of foreign materials. Have you noticed how completely out of place stone fireplaces and walls look since there is no stone in the Lowcountry? Instead, use brick, stucco, tabby, cypress and/or heart pine, which are all indigenous. Local clays made into bricks have a color palette that blends into the landscape. Cypress is naturally rot resistant and perfect for siding, soffits, and exterior trim. Reclaimed heart pine is beautiful and a sustainable choice for floors and interior cabinetry. Modern tabby is based on the local historic material of lime, sand, and oyster shells. Metal roofs reflect the hot sun and allow leaf trash to wash right off of the roof during our heavy rains.

Hurricanes, heat, and humidity are natural parts of our environment and the houses we design must respect this. Your house should respond to views, vegetation, wind, sun, and neighbors. Here in the South, our land defines us and our architecture. A house that recognizes its place seems to belong.  Many people move here because of the natural beauty of the landscape, so, work with it and create a home that is rooted in the Lowcountry landscape.